Peak District toad patrol set up to help toads cross the road safely

A Sheffield University staff member has set up a toad patrol to help toads cross Redmires Road in the Wyming Brook Nature Reserve.

 

Tabitha Roach, 27, a studio and estate assistant for architecture and landscape architecture at the University of Sheffield organised the patrol after seeing “hundreds of dead toads” along Redmires Road when visiting the Peak District last year.

 

Miss Roach, a resident of Crooks, said: “It was mainly seeing the dead toads and just thinking where has this come from.”

 

Redmires road was built to enable access to houses and farms along the road.

 

The road is mainly used by visitors who park their cars on the street when visiting the surrounding areas of Wyming Brook and Redmires reservoirs.

 

Road sign created by FrogLife to prevent toad deaths.

 

Miss Roach said she found out about toad patrols through an Instagram post.

 

She said: “I saw that somebody had posted something on Instagram that they were looking for people to do a toad crossing.

 

“So I looked it up and I found out that it was an actual thing and that Redmires was listed as a migration site and it all just kind of came together like that.”

 

A mile stretch of the road, which covers all three reservoirs within the Wyming Brook Nature Reserve, will be patrolled to help toads cross from the woodlands to the reservoir.

 

According to the FrogLife charity, in 2021 81,761 toads were estimated to have been helped cross UK roads with 6,266 killed trying.

Emily Bardgett, 42, a volunteer for the toad patrol said: “I’ve always been concerned about wildlife being killed on our roads. Until now I’ve felt helpless to be able to do anything to stop it.

“When I saw Tabitha asking for volunteers in a local Facebook group I thought it would be an ideal way to make a difference.”

 

There are 20 reported toad crossings in and around Sheffield with five being labelled as actively patrolled.

 

Miss Roach urges people to get involved as it is a great way to “connect with the environment”.

 

She said: ‘It is a great learning experience and a great way to build a community through meeting lots of new people.”

 

To volunteer to organise a toad patrol, to find or take part in a local toad patrol or register a toad crossing area visit www.froglife.org.

Written by Charlie Fenton

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